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If the signs were mythological creatures:

  • Aries: Werewolf
  • Taurus: Hell hound
  • Gemini: Doppelgänger
  • Cancer: Banshee
  • Leo: Fairy
  • Virgo: Angel
  • Libra: Nymph
  • Scorpio: Siren
  • Sagittarius: Ghost
  • Capricorn: Mermaid
  • Aquarius: Vampire
  • Pisces: Shapeshifter
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An Infinite List of Favorite Collections - Fouad Sarkis S/S 2014 Haute Couture [2/2]

(via misandryad)

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consultingasshat said: I LOVE YOUR BLOG SOOOO SO MUCH OMG COULD YOU DRAW A COMIC INVOLVING MERMAIDS AND MAYBE A DRAGON FOR ME

floccinaucinihilipilificationa:

I HAVE THE HEADCANON THAT DRAGONS THINK THAT MERMAIDS ARE SUPER COOL BECAUSE THEY LIVE IN WATER AND STUFF

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orcabelly:

hi guys. could I ask you to consider clicking on my commission link in my sidebar and consider commissioning me? the upfront cost of getting our apartment is going to be a lot. and also if you just want to help consider donating to my PayPal @ andsarahbellesaid@gmail.com? I’ll make a better post about this later but basically signal boost and consider commissioning or donating please ☺️ I love you all

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Tags: signal boost
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"For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”"

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

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lipsitck:

When i was little i never thought that eyebrows would ever be this important to me.

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Looking at the weather for today because people always ask.
We have

less than 1% chance of rain and 85% humidity. That is a “dry” day here.
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willowwish:

So I never posted my finished Garnet cosplay. Sowwy~ I get so excited during cons, I never really take formal pictures.

(via odysseiarex)

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pregamingforaslumberparty:

Afraid of Everyone - The National

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Anonymous said: *waves a distracting glittery thing in ur face* Hi, when's the last time you've been to the seaside? What's the most interesting pet you've ever heard of someone having? what super power would you choose if you got to pick one? I'm kind of stuck between time travel and teleportation, myself.

Oh wow, I haven’t been to the seaside in a long time. Well, I’ve been near the sea a lot, because Dublin.
But actually on a beach with toes in the water? Probably last summer.

The most interesting pet I know of is my ex’s best friend who had a wolf.

Super powers: it would have to be teleportation or, if I can make one up; languages. All the languages. I want to be able to understand and speak all languages please

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vsw:

Handsomest Man of France is a Woman

from the Soibelman Syndicate News Agency Collection

www.vsw.org

(via jackmarlowe)

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Hey all, so I just had a very scary and stressful journey home and am feeling v not good right now. Who wants to come talk at me and be distracting/comforting?

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asianhistory:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

Wonderful to get further sources. 

asianhistory:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

Wonderful to get further sources. 

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista, via degenezijde)